SCHOOL OF GENERAL EDUCATION

Brief History

          Commenced in 1970 when the College was established, the School deals with the largest number of students in the College. It was one Division and one Department up to 1996 when it was converted, through the NCCE guidelines, into the School of Education. This was later followed with compartmentalization of Department of Education into three Departments viz: Educational Foundations, Curriculum and Instruction and Educational Psychology. The School of Education plays tremendous roles in the conduct and execution of Teaching practice to all the students. Education students’ grouping used to be A, B, and C from N.C.E. One to three. With the substantial increase in students’ population, grouping of Education students is now expanded to A, B, C, D, E and F respectively.

          Even though, Education Department is compartmentalized into three, there is no distinct line of demarcation since all assignments/duties/responsibilities are interwoven and intertwined. It also should be noted that the Departments of  General Studies, Early Childhood Care Education (ECCE) and Primary Education Studies (PES) were all under the  school before 2009. However, in 2009 Departments of ECCE and PED were curved out of the School and they now stand as a school of their own. In short the School of General Education currently comprises of 4 departments with a Centre for Educational Technology (CET).

Philosophy

          In order to maintain conformity and uniformity of educational practices throughout the Federation, the philosophical ideals of Nigerian education centred on creating a nation whose citizens are free and democratic, just and egalitarian; united, strong and self-reliant great and dynamic and  full of bright opportunities.

Objectives

          The objectives are to prepare and train efficient and effective teachers for Primary and Post-primary Institutions. Thus, the mission of Teacher Education should among others include:

Introducing them to useful knowledge in the foundation courses in Education.

Providing them with skills regarding methods and techniques of teaching and training in the art of teaching.

Helping to inculcate and develop desirable attitudes towards children, the teaching profession and the Nigerian Community they are trained and prepared to serve.

Production of well-motivated teachers with high personal and professional discipline, integrity and competence for all the levels of the educational system.

Preparation of teachers with appreciable expertise in curriculum planning, development and delivery, as well as competence in research, guidance and counselling.

Continuous preparation and upgrading of teachers who can stand out for their professional competence, sense of social responsibility and commitments, to function effectively as constructive socio-economic, moral and spiritual change-agents needed to promote goodwill, peace and progress not only in the country, but also in the world of 21st century.

Specifically, at the end of the NCE, programme, the students should be able to:-

Discuss intelligently, the main ideas that have affected and still affect the development and practice of education generally and in Nigeria in particular.

Examine the main psychological, health and socio-economic factors that may help or hinder a child’s educational performance

Study learners appropriately to determine the most effective ways of relating to them to ensure their maximum achievement.

Professionally combine use of conventional and other motivational instructional learning strategies in generating and imparting knowledge, attitudes and skills.

Develop, select and effectively use appropriate curriculum processes, teaching strategies, instructional materials and methods for maximum learner achievement.

Broaden their intellectual perspectives through the General Studies Education Programme.

Demonstrate desirable attributes in moral and character development.

Discuss intelligently the main issues affecting teacher Education and the teaching profession in Nigeria.

Identify major problems of education in Nigeria and their corresponding solutions.

Demonstrate proficiency in measuring and evaluating learning outcomes as well as in carrying out appropriate research on educational problem in Nigeria.

Departments under the School

There are four (4) Departments under the School of General Education namely, Curriculum Studies and Instruction, Educational Foundations, Educational Psychology, General Studies Education and a Centre for Education Technology.      As pointed out earlier that though, Education Department was compartmentalized into three, there is no distinct line of demarcation since all assignments/duties/responsibilities are interwoven and intertwined. Therefore the three departments will be treated as one except where necessary.

Courses offered by the three Departments

NCE I First Semester

Code Course Title Credits Status
EDU111 History of Education in Nigeria 1 C
EDU112 Educational psychology 1 (Child psychology) 2 C
EDU113 Principles and Methods of Teaching at Junior Secondary Level 2 C
  Total 5 Units

NCE I Second Semester

EDU 121 Sociology of Education 1 C
EDU 122 Introduction to Teacher Education 1 C
EDU 123 Philosophy of Education 1 C
EDU 124 Theory and Practice of Child Friendly Schools 2 C
EDU 125 Educational Psychology II (Human Learning) 2 C
  Total 7 Units

NCE II First Semester

EDU 211 Practicum in Classroom Management and Organisation 1 C
EDU 212 Educational Technology: Theory and Practice 2 C
EDU 213 Micro-Teaching: Theory 1 C
EDU 214 Introduction to Research Methods 1 C
EDU 215 Education of Special Target Groups 1 E
  Total 6 Units

NCE II Second Semester

EDU 221 Curriculum Studies I 1 C
EDU 222 Measurement and Evaluation 2 C
EDU 223 Micro-Teaching Practicum 1 C
EDU 224 Educational Administration, Planning and Supervision 2 C
EDU 225 Introduction to Special Education 1 C
    7 Units

NCE III First Semester

EDU 311 Teaching Practice 6 C

NCE III Second Semester

EDU 321 Curriculum Studies II 1 C
EDU 322 Adolescent Psychology 1 C
EDU 323 Research Project 2 C
EDU 324 Introduction to Theory and Practice of Guidance and Counseling. 1 C
EDU 325 Introduction to Adult and Non-Formal Education 1 E
    6 Units

Graduation Requirements

Candidates for the award of N.C.E Certificates are required among others, to earn the following:

General Education 30 Credits

Teaching Practice                     06 Credits

Total                                        36 Credits

COURSE DESCRIPTION

EDU 111 HISTORY OF EDUCATION IN NIGERIA ( 1 CREDIT) C

Concept and Rationale of History of Education

Brief History of Education: Ancient Greek and Roman Education

African Indigenous System of Education/African Traditional Education (ATE)

Islamic Education in Nigeria

Christian Missionary/Western Education in Nigeria

Nigerian Education since 1960

Evolution of Junior Secondary Education in Nigeria

EDU 112 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY I – CHILD DEVELOPMENT

(2 CREDITS) C

Meaning and Scope of Education Psychology

Relevance of Psychology to Teacher Education

Human Reproduction: Principles of Human Growth and Development

Stages and Essential Features of Human Growth and Development up to Adolescent (physical, social, emotional, intellectual and moral).

Theories of Personality Development (Any two of Sigmund Freud/Psucho-analytic Theory, Types, Theory and Traits Theory)

Individual Differences

Heredity and Environment

EDU 113 PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF TEACHING JUNIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION (2 CREDITS) C

Institutions could schedule this course in the 1st or 2nd semester in Year 1 as appropriate to their local environment.

Objectives and Categories of Objectives in the Teaching-Learning Process, Instructional Objectives, Behavioral Objectives, Expressive Objectives, etc.

Formulating Behavioral Objectives

Principles underlying the Choice of Teaching Methods at the Junior Secondary Level

Types of Instructional Methods, Techniques and Approaches in Teaching (At least two examples are to be selected for treatment from each of the types below):

Distinction based on degree of teacher and Student/Pupil Activity.

Teacher-Centred Methods: Lecture, Story Telling, Demonstration Methods etc.

Student-Centred or Pupil-Centre Methods

EDU 121 SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION FOR JUNIOR SECONDARY

(1 CREDIT) C

The Nature and Scope of Sociology of Education

Socialization, concepts, types and agencies

The child, the Junior School and group dynamics

The concepts, attitudes and beliefs of Nigerians about population education

Improvement of Quality of Life through POP/FLE

Influence of various social factors on learning processes at JS level

Social Stratification and School Achievement

Culture, Social Change and Education

The Concept of Culture: Cultural Dimensions of JS Education

The Concept of Social Change; Education as a change agent in Nigeria

Consequences of Social Change on Nigerian Education

The Junior Secondary School as a Formal Organization

Sociological analysis of contemporary issues in JS Education e.g. National Consciousness, National Integration, Religious Tolerance, Cultism, Examination Malpractice, Drug Abuse, Riots etc.

EDU 122 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHER EDUCATION FOR JUNIOR SECONDARY (1 CREDIT) C

The concept, aims and objectives of Junior Secondary Teacher Education

The roles of JS teacher (a) in the school (b) as a member of a population group in Nigeria.

Concept of profession; Teaching as a profession; Professionalization of teaching in Nigeria.

Ethics of the Teaching profession

Professional organizations in teaching and other fields

The Status and Profession of Teaching World-Wide: UNESCO/ILO Provisions.

Teachers Registration Council of Nigeria (TRCN) and Professionalization of Teaching.

Building up the Ego/image of the would be JS teacher-trainee.

EDU 123 PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION FOR JUNIOR SECONDARY

(1 CREDIT) C

The Relevance and Importance of Philosophy of Education to the Student Teacher.

Schools of Thought in Philosophy and some leading philosophers and their implication to Junior Secondary Education

Naturalism : Rousseau, Herbert Spencer,

Idealism : Plato, Thomas Aquinas, Hegel

Realism : Aristotle, Frederick Herbert

Pragmatism : Dewey, William James

Existentialism : Camus, Satre, Kier Kegard

Africanism : Nkrumah, Nyerere, Fafunwa, Majasan etc

Contributions of these philosophers to the practical methodology of Junior Secondary Education

The Concept of Education

(a) Processes: teaching, training, instruction, indoctrination, cultivation, facilitation, mentoring, imparting etc.

(b) Philosophy of Nigerian Education: The Evolution and Tenets of Developmentalism, Goals, Aims and Objectives of Nigerian Education.

Philosophical examination of some concepts in relation to Junior Secondary Education; e.g. Rationality, Justice, Responsibility, Creativity, Self-reliance, Life-long Education, Freedom, Democracy, Equality of Educational Opportunities.

EDU 124 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF CHILD-FRIENDLY SCHOOLS

(2 Credits) C

Course Description

This course introduces students to the child friendly concept, its underlying assumptions and key principles from which the main characteristics of a Child Friendly School (CFS) are derived. It discusses CFS models as being holistic and based on a concept of quality education that is multi-dimensional and concerned with the total needs of the child as the central focus and beneficiary of all education decisions. Quality is conceptualized not merely as good teaching methods and learning outcomes but also includes considerations of health and nutrition status of learners; adequacy of available facilities, services and supplies; as well as levels of safety and protection afforded by the learning environment. These are important not simply as means of supporting good teaching and promoting learning achievement, but also as goals in their own right and valid indicators of quality education from a child rights perspective. The piloting of the CFS approach in Nigeria will also be focused on and where possible students will be encouraged to visit child friendly schools in their respective states or communities.

Content outline

1. Introduction to Child Friendly schools concept, principles and models

Definition and characteristics of Child Friendly schools

Key generic principles of CFS based on the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC): child-centredness democratic participation, inclusiveness.

Quality as holistic and multi-dimensional

2. Characteristics of a child-friendly school

Principle 1: Child Rights and Inclusive Education

Principle 2: Effective Teaching and Learning Environments

Principle 3: Safe Supportive and Protective Learning Environments

Principle 4: Healthy and Health-seeking Learning Environments

Principle 5: Gender-sensitive Learning Environments

Principle 6: Democratic Participation and Partnership Building

3. The Policy context for CFS in Nigeria: policies that promote the CFS approach

4. Child-Friendly Schools Standards and Indicators for Teacher Education

5. Teacher preparation for CFS: child centred, interactive methodologies based on constructivist principles and activity-based learner-centred approach

Application of Constructivism to Teaching and learning

General Principles of Constructivist Learning

Characteristics of Constructivist Teaching

Some Examples of Constructivist teaching Models

6. Facilities required in a Child-Friendly School

7. Resources Required for CFS Teaching and Learning

8. Assessment of Teaching in a CFS

9. Technology in CFS Learning and Teaching

10. Strategies for Mainstreaming CFS concept and principles in Nigeria

EDU 125 EDUCATION PSYCHOLOGY II (HUMAN LEARNING)

(2 CREDITS) C

Concept of Learning

Learning Theories and their application in the classroom situation

Behaviourist theories of learning

Cognitivist theories of learning

Constructivist theories of learning

Transfer of learning; factors affecting learning

Motivation

The concepts of Reward and Punishment with emphasis on their practical application in education

Memory, Rote-Learning and Over-Learning

Remembering and Forgetting

Effects of rural and urban settings on learning, managing of over-crowding classroom.

YEAR TWO – FIRST SEMESTER

EDU 211 PRACTICUM IN CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT AND SCHOOL ORGANISATION (1 CREDIT) C

Brief concepts of classroom management and organization

Classroom organization

Classroom leadership

Classroom arrangement

Class control

Class maintenance etc.

Class record keeping

Attendance register

Result master sheet

Report card

Dossier (pupil’s cumulative record)

Syllabus

Diary keeping: (i) scheme of work, (ii) record of work

The Junior Secondary Teacher, instructional materials and the learner

Class discipline

The concept and essence of school public relations

Factors influencing school-public relations

Staff-management relations

Student-staff relations

Parent-staff relations

Junior Secondary School environment

School programme

School performance

NOTE:

EDU 212 EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY: THEORY AND PRACTICE

(2 CREDITS) C

The concept and history of Educational Technology in Nigeria

The place of Educational Technology in communication and the Teaching – Learning Processes at the Junior Secondary Level.

The concept and process of communication

The concept of Systems Approach to Instruction (SAI) at the Junior Secondary Level

Multi-Media in Junior Secondary Education, Major Characteristics of Educational Media; Use of Multi-Media in promoting interdisciplinary/integrated studies.

Computer-Assisted Teaching/Learning at the Junior Secondary Level

Enter-Educate (Entertainment Education) approach to teaching of POP/FLE at the Junior Secondary Level.

Principles and practice of design, production, improvisation, use, maintenance, storage and retrieval of educational media for the Junior Secondary Level.

Community resources in Junior Secondary Education

Photocopy and video production (with practicals)

(The CET must be adequately funded to provide all that is required).

Establishment and Organization of Centre for Educational Technology

Introduction

The Centre for Educational Technology (CET) should be a service unit in the School of Education which acquires, produces and houses instructional resources to facilitate effective teaching and learning in all the Schools of the College. The unit is to be headed by a Co-ordinator who must be a specialist in Educational Technology, with a minimum qualification of Master’s Degree and not less than Senior Lecturer grade. The facilities should include the following:

EDU 213 MICRO-TEACHING – THEORY (1 CREDIT) C

The concept and process of Micro-Teaching

Relevance of Micro-Teaching to Teacher Education

Micro-Teaching Practicum with emphasis on teach/re-teach cycles

Set Induction

Stimulus Variation

Planned Repetition

Reinforcement

Non-Verbal communication

Questioning

Closure

Evaluation

Merits and Demerits of Micro-Teaching

EDU 214 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS (1 CREDIT) C

The Nature and Meaning of Research

Types of Research

Typology based on use

Pure Research

Action or Applied Research

Typology based on form

Historical Research

Descriptive Survey

Experimental Research

Typology based on kind of evidence and analysis used

Quantitative Research

Qualitative Research

Eclectic or Triangular Research or Multiple Perspectives Research

i) Quantitative Techniques: Scored (Likert-type) questionnaires, tests, experiments etc.

ii) Qualitative Techniques: Structured interview, semi-structured interview, unstructured interview, participant observation, non-participant observation, use of documents, use of arte-facts or objects, audio and audio-visual materials.

iii) Reliability and validity of Research Instruments

i) The Quantitative Approach: frequency counts; percentage and graphs, etc.

ii) Qualitative Techniques: content analysis of textual and non-textual materials, transcription of interviews, audio and video-materials, documentary analysis, historical analysis, etc.

Writing a Research Proposal

Writing a Research Report

iii) Bibliography Techniques: References and Citations

EDU 215 Education of Special target Groups 1 Credit Elective

Education of Adults, Women, migrants etc. (Rationale, objectives, principles)

Principles and strategies of Non-formal education

Principles and strategies of Distance education (DE); distance Learning System (DLS), Open and Distance Education (DE); Distance Learning System (DLS), Open and Distance Learning (ODL)

Women education: Issues, problems and prospects

Nomadic education principles and practices in Nigeria

Education of migrant fishermen: principles and strategies

Education of other sub-cultural groups e.g. traders, artisans etc.

YEAR TWO – SECOND SEMESTER

EDU 221 CURRICULUM STUDIES I (1 CREDIT) C

Meaning and scope of Curriculum

Basic Curriculum concepts, the Curriculum as a teaching plan

Types of Curriculum

Typology based on design

Broad fields/integrated curriculum

Core curriculum

Single Subjects/Discrete Subject Curriculum

Teacher-centred curriculum

Student-centred or Pupil-centred curriculum or Activity curriculum etc.

Typology based on official recognition

Official or formal curriculum

Informal/Hidden curriculum

Typology based on Teacher-Learner Perspectives

Teacher-centred curriculum

Student-centred or Pupil-centred curriculum or Activity curriculum etc.

Other Common Classifications or types

History of Junior Secondary Curriculum Development in Nigeria

Agencies of Junior Secondary Curriculum Development

Junior Secondary Curriculum Agencies: Agencies of curriculum planning/innovation in Nigeria

(Federal/State Ministries of Education and Curriculum Development Centres; WAEC, NECO, NERDC, NUC, NCCE, NBTE, CON, STAN, etc.

EDU 222 MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION (2 CREDITS) C

Meaning and Scope of Measurement and Evaluation

Function of Measurement and Evaluation for Teachers

Demographic data collection and analysis

Uses of tests, common dimension for classifying tests at Junior Secondary Level

Teacher-Made Tests, standardized tests, validation of evaluation instruments,

Basic statistics, measures of central tendency, spread, dispersion or variability, census and vital registration in Junior Secondary Education.

Continuous Assessment in Junior Secondary Education: meaning, scope, principles, prospects and problems

Construction, use and interpretation of Norm-Referenced Tests and Criterion-Referenced Tests for the Junior Secondary Level.

Examination Ethics

Assessment of the non-cognitive domains at the Junior Secondary Level

a) Observation techniques, checklists and rating scale

b) Self-reporting techniques (interview, questionnaires, inventory)

c) Socio-metric techniques

d) Projective techniques

EDU 223 MICROTEACHING PRACTICUM (1 CREDIT) C

This should be handled in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction of School of Education. Every academic staff in the college should be involved. (This is the practical component of EDU 213)

EDU 224 EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION, PLANNING AND SUPERVISION

(2 CREDITS) C

Concept of organization; types of organizations

Concept of Administration/Educational Administration and Management

General Principles of Administration

Resource Management and Junior Secondary school records

Population and related data for Educational Planning and Administration

The control of Junior Secondary Education in Nigeria

Discipline in Junior Secondary Schools

Programme Planning in Junior Secondary Schools (Budgeting, sports, examinations, founders’ day etc.)

Financing Junior Secondary Education

Leadership and leadership styles

Education laws and regulations.

Concept and purposes of Junior Secondary School supervision.

Types of supervision/inspection at the Junior Secondary Level:

Internal supervision – by Principal, Vice Principal, Heads of Departments, Class Teachers, Student Officers, Senior Students, Personnel Supervision, etc.

Qualities of a good supervisor

Traditional and modern supervisory methods

Principles of supervision

Challenges/Problems of Junior Secondary School supervision in Nigeria

EDU 225 INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION (1 CREDIT) C

Historical development of Special Education with particular reference to Nigeria.

National Policy on Education and Special Education

Types of exceptionalities

Causes, characteristics, identification, intervention strategies and procedures

Attitudes and beliefs, philosophy of education for exceptional children

General problems associated with each type of exceptionality as well as symptoms

Inclusive Education:-

– Implementation of Inclusive Education

– Interdisciplinary collaboration in Inclusive Classroom

– Creating and Managing Inclusive Classroom

– Methodology in Inclusive Classroom

YEAR THREE – FIRST SEMESTER

EDU 311 TEACHING PRACTICE (6 CREDITS) C

This course is compulsory for all students registered for the NCE programme. It is one Semester duration to be run at a stretch from the beginning of the First Semester Year Three to the end. The important areas of emphasis include:

structional planning and studies in teaching methods;

Instructional technology;

Micro-teaching mentoring (Model Teaching, Assessment, Feedback Reports etc)

A minimum of ten supervisors per student before final computation of each student’s TP score;

Posting of students to schools where they can practice their major courses of study.

YEAR THREE – SECOND SEMESTER

EDU 321 CURRICULUM STUDIES II (1 CREDIT) C

The Curriculum Process

Planning

Development

Implementation

Evaluation

Curriculum development strategies for Junior Secondary Education

Curriculum Research

Curriculum Innovation

EDU 322 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY (1 CREDIT) C

Meaning and Scope of Adolescent Psychology

Theories of Adolescence

Growth and Development during Adolescence:

Physical

Moral

Social

Intellectual

Emotional

Educational implications of early and late maturation

Development tasks of the Adolescent

Adolescent concerns and problems: drug abuse, sexuality, school adjustment, religion and politics, examination malpractice, cultism, riots, armed robbery, etc.

Challenges of the adolescent in the home, school and society

Educational interventions during adolescence: Approaches, Strategies and Counselling.

EDU 323 RESEARCH PROJECT (2 CREDITS) C

All students registered for the NCE programme are expected to complete an original research project before a certificate can be awarded. The project may be in the area of the students’ teaching subjects or General Education. Only one project may be written in Education or in the student’s major teaching subject.

Projects can be written individually or in groups of not more than 5 students. The project must be closely supervised by a qualified staff of the Department and assessed by the competent external assessor appointed by the Department from outside the College. The score is to be recorded and computed in the School of Education.

EDU 324 INTRODUCTIONS TO THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING (1 CREDIT) C

Concept of Guidance and Counseling, distinctions and goals

History and development of Guidance and Counseling practices in Nigeria

Theories of counseling

Ethics of the counseling profession

Guidance Services in Schools

Communication skills in Guidance

Study skills

Health counseling, e.g. AIDS, Drug Abuse, Alcoholism, smoking etc.

Tests in Guidance and Counseling

Career Education and Development; career education in relation to the labour market.

Sex Education and Marriage counseling

Organization and Administration of Guidance and Counseling

Establishing A Counseling Centre In The School Setting

Introduction

A Counseling Centre is a unit where clients come for counseling on issues that affect them. These could be educational, vocational or personal/social issues. As such, it is expected that such a centre should be conducive for free interaction between the counselor and the client. (It is a service unit for all the schools in the college)

EDU 325 Introduction to Adult and Non-formal Education 1 Credit E

Nature and Scope of Adult education

Adult Education in Nigeria: Problems and Prospects

Characteristics of the Adult Learner

Methods and materials of teaching Adult Learners

Adult education and Human Resources Development in Nigeria

Adult Education and National Development in Nigeria: Community, political, socio-economic etc.

Types of Adult Education Organizations

Cross-Cultural comparison or Adult education programmes

TEACHING PRACTICE 

 PHILOSOPHY OF TEACHING PRACTICE

Teaching Practice is an integral part of teacher education programme aimed at providing student-teachers an opportunity to put into practice their theoretical knowledge in a real school-life situation. It also offers teacher educators and educational managers a golden opportunity for practical appraisal of the effectiveness of teacher education programme.

OBJECTIVES OF TEACHING PRACTICE

i. To expose student-teachers to real life classroom experiences under the supervision of professional teachers.

ii. To provide the forum for student-teacher to translate educational theories and principles into practice.

iii. To enable student-teachers discover their own strengths and weaknesses in classroom teaching and provide opportunities to enable them overcome their weaknesses and consolidate on their strengths.

iv. To familiarize student-teachers with the school environment as their future work place.

v. To provide student-teachers with an opportunity for further acquisition of professional skills, competencies, personal characteristics and experience for full-time teaching after graduation.

vi. To help student-teachers develop a positive attitude towards the teaching profession.

vii. To serve as a means of assessing the professional competence of student-teachers.

ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF TEACHING PRACTICE

The College organizes Teaching Practice for its students in conformity with NCCE Minimum Standards. Usually, the First Semester of NCE III is dedicated for the exercise. Each student is expected to spend a minimum of 26 weeks in the Teaching Practice exercise. There is Teaching Practice Committee headed by the Deputy Provost, with all the Deans, Director Academic Planning and College TP Coordinator as members. There is also another Sub-TP Committee headed by the College TP coordinator with the School TP coordinators and Departmental TP officers as members. The Sub-TP Committee submit some of their activities to the Main Committee for rectification and guidance.

All students are posted to the schools of their choice within Sokoto State. However, any student that requests posting outside the State will bear the cost of transportation and other expenses to be paid at time of PT registration. It worthy students to note that they are expected to take minimum of 10 periods and maximum of 18 periods per week. He/she is also expected to be supervised at least 10 times. Student-teachers are expected to be of good behavior during and even after the TP. There is always an orientation programme organized by the College for all prospective student-teachers prior to the commencement of assignment.

Members of Academic Staff in the Department of Curriculum Studies

S/No. Name Qualifications Rank
1 Danlami Garba NCE, M Ed, PhD C/Lecturer
2 Dr.(Mrs) A.D. Sulaiman NCE, B Ed, M Ed, PhD Chief Lecturer
3 T.S. Bamgbiye B Sc, PGDE P/Lecturer
4 Hauwa M. Abdulkarim NCE, B Sc Ed, M Ed S/Lecturer
5 Mrs. Fausiat Bakor N.C.E. B.A.ED, M Ed S/Lecturer
6 Felicia C. Akpan B Sc Ed, M Sc Ed Lecturer I
7 Musa A. Girkau NCE, B Sc Ed Lecturer I
8 Bala Ahmad Shagari NCE, BA Ed Lecturer II
9 Umar Abdullah Kilgori NCE, BA Ed, M Ed Lecturer I
10 Abdullah Bello Tambuwal NCE, B Sc Ed, M Ed S/Lecturer
11 Abubakar Bala BA Ed, M Ed, PhD P/Lecturer
12 Ahmad Umar Tambuwal NCE, BA Ed, M Ed Lecturer II
13 Mansur  Bello BA Ed Lecturer II
14 Armiya’u Bala BA Ed Lecturer II
15 Fauziya I. Bakori BA Ed, M Ed P/L 13
16 Bashiru Aliyu Gada BA Ed, M Ed L I 11
17 Mode Marafa BA Ed, M Ed L I 11
18 Bashar Muhd Yabo BA Ed, M Ed L I 11
19 Rukayya Malami BA Ed L I 11
20 Aminu Shehu Sifawa B Sc Ed, M Ed L I 11
21 Bala Ahmad Shagari BA Ed L II 09
22 Felicia C. Akpan B Sc Ed, M Ed S/L  12
23 Abdulkadir Salisu Imam B Sc Ed,  M Ed L II 09
24 Auwalu Bala Bodinga B Sc Ed, M Ed L II 09
25 Isah Aliyu B Sc Ed, M Ed L II 09
26 Aishatu Yusuf B Sc Ed, M Ed L II 09
27 Nasiru Muhd Garba B Sc Ed, M Ed L II 09
28 Umar Altine B Sc Ed, M Ed L II 09
29 Abubakar Aminu B Sc Ed, M Ed L II 09
30 Armiya’u Bala BA Ed L II 09
31 Mikailu Muhammad B Sc Ed, M Ed L II 09
32 Muhammad Idris B Sc Ed A/L 08
33 Abdulkadir Dahiru B. Ed INST. II

Members of Academic Staff in the Department of Psychology

S/No. Name Qualifications Rank
1. Dr. Attahiru Hussaini N.C.E. B.A. ED. M.ED, PhD C/Lecturer
2. Dr. R.U. Okoro N.C.E. B. Sc. ED; PH.D P/Lecturer
3. Mrs. F.M. Fabunmi N.C.E, B.A.ED; M.ED P/Lecturer .
4. Mrs. S. A. D. Umar B Sc, M Ed S/Lecturer
5. Mal. Aminu A. Dada B.Sc, M Ed Lecturer I
6. Taybat B. Shinco BA Ed, M Ed S/Lecturer
7. Dr. Abubakar Boyi NCE, M Ed, PhD S/Lecturer
8. Ayuba Muhd Kagara NCE, BA Ed, M Ed Lecturer I
9. Dr. Riskatu Muhammad BA, PGDE, M Ed, PhD C/Lecturer
10. Efeghelesa Omena BA Ed A/Lecturer
11. Umar Abubakar N. BA Ed, M Ed Lecturer I
12. Nafi’u Abdulazeez BA Ed, M Ed A/Lecturer
13. Bello Waziri BA Ed, M Ed A/Lecturer
14. Abdullahi M. Bello Tambuwal B Sc Ed, M Ed P/L
15. Hannatu Abdullahi B Sc Ed, M Ed P/L
16. Nasiru Muhammad Sani B Sc Ed, M Ed S/L
17. Nasiru Bello BA Ed, M Ed S/L
18 Abdulkadir Muhd Ruwah B Sc Ed, M Ed L I 11
19 Ahmad Bello Tambuwal BA, M Ed S/L 12
20. Halima M. Maishanu BA Ed, M Ed P/L 13
21. Fatima Abubakar Dogon-daji M Ed L I 11
22. Abubakar Sadiq Musa BA Ed, M Ed L I 11
23. Abdullahi Shafi’i B Sc, M Ed L II 09
24. Shehu Attahiru J B Sc Ed, M Ed L I 11
25. Murtala M. Ibrahim B Ed, M Ed L II 09
26. Buhari  Lawal B Ed, M Ed L I 11
27. Mainuna Usman B Ed, M Ed L II 09
28. Abubakar Abdullah Umar B Ed, M Ed L I 11
29. Yusuf Umar Abdullahi BA Ed, M Ed L II 09
30. Jazuli Hassan BA Ed, M Ed L II 09
31. Aminu Hussaini B Sc Ed, M Ed L II 09

Members of Academic Staff in the Department of Educational Foundations

S/No. Name Qualifications Rank
1. Mal. M.J. Haruna N.C.E., B.A.ED, M.ED. C/Lecturer
2. Dr. A.M. Yabo N.C.E., B.A.ED; M.ED, PhD C/Lecturer
3. Mrs. O.A. Oke B.A.ED. M.ED C/Lecturer
4. Dr. Hamza Sulaiman NCE, B Ed, M Ed, PhD C/Lecturer
5. Mal. Garba Lawal N.C.E. B.A.ED, M.ED C/ Lecturer
6. Dr. Zainab Alhassan B Ed, M Ed, PhD S/Lecturer
7. Dr. Bashir Muhammad Liman NCE, B Sc Ed, M Ed, PhD S/Lecturer
8. Junaidu Magaji NCE, BA Ed Lecturer I
9. Lami Sulaiman BA Ed, M Ed P/Lecturer
10. Mrs. B. Okolie B Sc Ed, M Ed S/Lecturer
11. Cecilia Okonkwo B Sc, M Ed S/Lecturer
12. Nasir M. Sani NCE, BA Ed, M Ed S/Lecturer
13. Sadiya Magaji NCE, BA Ed, Med P/Lecturer
14. Samaila Bello NCE, B Ed, M Ed S/Lecturer I
15. Bashar Muhammad Yabo NCE, B Sc Ed, M Ed Lecturer I
16. Abbas Abubakar Hiliya B. Ed,  M Ed L II 09
17. Hassan Abubakar Horo BA  M Ed L II 09
18. Nafisa Abdullahi BA Ed, M Ed S/L 12
19. Idris Ahmad Isa B Sc Ed A/L 08
20. Zayyanu Samb BA Ed, M Ed S/L 12
21. Mansur Bello B Sc Ed L II 09
22. Onyebu N. Georgina B Sc, M Ed C/L 14

 

LIST OF STAFF IN THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

  • AMINU HASSAN – College Teaching Practice Coordinator

He was born on 24th January, 1969 in Sokoto South Local Government, Sokoto State. He had his early education at Turaki Primary School, Sokoto, between 1974 to 1979 and proceeded to Government Teachers College, Wurno between 1979 to 1984. He obtained his Nigeria Certificate in Education at Institute of Education ABU Zaria and B.A (English) at UsmanDanfodiyo University, Sokoto in 1988 and 1995 respectively. He obtained his M.A (English) at Coventry University U.K in 2016. He joined the service of the College in 1997 and held many positions in the College and now is currently serving as the College Teaching Practice Coordinator. As an academic staff, Aminu Hassan has published many articles in reputable journals at National and International Conferences and Seminars.


  • DR. ZAINAB ALHASSAN – HOD, Psychology

 She was born on 13th July, 1970 in Kaduna State. She had her first leaving certificate and Secondary School Leaving Certificate in 1981 and 1986 respectively, Diploma in Adult Education in 1998 and obtained her masters in guidance and counseling PhD in guidance and counseling in 2006 and 2019 respectively. Dr. Zainab is an experienced program officer with over 9 years experience and the ability to take technical lead in community program. She is currently the head of psychology department. As an academic staff Dr. Zainab publish many papers at Local and International Conferences.